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First National Bank of Fort Worth Archives

History

The First National Bank had its beginnings in 1876 as an exchange office. Seven years later M. B. Loyd and his associates received a charter for a national bank. For generations, the institution was known as the “cattleman’s bank.” Among its principal stock holders were W. T. Waggoner, Burk Burnett and John Scharbauer, some of the largest ranchers in the state. During World War II and afterwards, the bank diversified into petroleum, aircraft production and other manufacturing. It also was a major contributor to Fort Worth’s cultural life, sponsoring activities and commissioning two major art projects, a sculpture garden by Isamu Noguchi and the Landmark paintings by Bror Utter. In the 1980s and 1990s, the bank underwent a series of mergers, finally becoming part of Nations Bank.

Provenance

The files were created by the Marketing/Public Relations department of the First National Bank of Fort Worth. They were donated to the library by Nations Bank in 1995.

Scope and Contents Note

These records document the history and operations of the bank and in particular the promotional activities of the marketing and public relations department. There is a considerable biographical material pertaining to Fort Worth citizens who were officers or stockholders in the bank. The records include correspondence, memoranda, pamphlets, published reports, scrapbooks, photographs, audio/video tape and memorabilia organized into the following series:

  • Series I : History Files
  • Series II : Reports and Publications
  • Series III : Marketing Files
  • Series IV : Officers and Directors Files
  • Series V : New Building Files
  • Series VI : Subject Files
  • Series VII : Photographs
  • Series VIII : Minutes, Ledgers and Manuals
  • Series IX : Financial Statements of Other Banks
  • Series X : Scrapbooks
  • Series XI : Films, Video Tape and Audio Tape
  • Series XII : Memorabilia
  • Series XIII : Oversized items

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Last updated: June 26, 2014