Home > News

Census Bureau's new experimental tool shows how vulnerable communities are to disasters, including COVID-19

Posted July 2, 2020

Archived Content Information and links provided may no longer be accurate.

For the first time, using newly-developed experimental estimates, the U.S. Census Bureau has created a tool to help measure the degree of a community’s resilience in the face of disasters and other emergencies.

The Community Resilience Estimates identifies a community’s ability to endure, respond and recover from the impact of disasters.

Individuals with three or more risk factors – from health and income to age and living conditions – are considered high risk. Likewise, communities are high risk if at least 30% of their population has three or more risk factors.

The risk factors include: aged 65 and above; low-income household; single or no caregiver household; household communication barrier; employment status; disability status; physical crowding; lack of health insurance; respiratory disease; heart disease; and diabetes.

Preliminary results show that 34% of counties in the South, particularly in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Arkansas, have at least 30% of their population high risk.

Tarrant County results shows that 30 census tracts average three or more risk factors, 56 tracts average one or two risk factors, and 15 tracts average zero risk factors.

Rural counties are far more likely to have greater proportions of high-risk populations. Thirty percent of all rural counties are high-risk compared to 14% of all urban counties.

Some of the factors that are associated with more high-risk communities include:

  • Low income, especially in rural communities.
  • Greater proportion of single mothers.
  • Majority Black and Hispanic population.
  • Greater proportion of residents 65 and older, a population at significant risk for infection and developing severe illness.

Stakeholders can use the tool in addition to other tools to help combat the current crisis and plan for future health and weather-related disasters.

Get articles like this in your inbox. Subscribe to City News.

City News

Calendar

Fort Worth Art Commission Public Hearing: 9 a.m. Aug. 10, 2020; WebEx Virtual Meeting.

Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission Public Hearing: 2 p.m. Aug. 10, 2020; WebEx.
View the agenda »
Register for this event »

City of Fort Worth Art Commission Special Called Meeting: 5 p.m. Aug. 10, 2020; Webex.
View the agenda »
Register for this event »

Cantrell Sansom Road Virtual Project Meeting: 6 p.m. Aug. 10, 2020; Virtual Meeting.

Ad Hoc Municipal Court Advisory Committee: 11 a.m. Aug. 11, 2020; City Managers Office Conference Room 380, 3rd floor, City Hall, 200 Texas St.

Audit Committee: 1 p.m. Aug. 11, 2020; City Council Conference Room 290, 2nd Floor, City Hall, 200 Texas St.

Infrastructure & Transportation Committee: 2 p.m. Aug. 11, 2020; City Council Conference Room 290, 2nd Floor, City Hall, 200 Texas ST..

City Council Work Session: 3 p.m. Aug. 11, 2020; City Council Conference Room 290, 2nd Floor, City Hall, 200 Texas St.

City Council Meeting: 7 p.m. Aug. 11, 2020; City Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, City Hall, 200 Texas St.

Notice of Public Hearing to consider amendments to the Trust Agreement for the Fort Worth Permanent Fund: 7 p.m. Aug. 11, 2020; City Council Chambers, 2nd Floor, City Hall, 200 Texas St.
View the agenda »

Vase with Nine Flowers Dedication: 9:30 a.m. Aug. 12, 2020; Facebook.

City Plan Commission: 10 a.m. Aug. 12, 2020; City Hall.

Zoning Commission Public Hearing: 1 p.m. Aug. 12, 2020; WebEx.
View the agenda »
Register for this event »

Collaborate, Meet & Work Remotely: 2 p.m. Aug. 12, 2020; Online.
Register for this event »

Grow With Google: Collaborate, Meet, and Work Remotely: 2 p.m. Aug. 12, 2020; Online.
Register for this event »

Southside Infrastruction Improvements Virtual Project Meeting: 6 p.m. Aug. 12, 2020; Virtual Meeting.

View the full city calendar and current meetings.